He Walked Right In and He Turned Around and He Walked Right Out Again

LYRICS

We put an extra on the street
Last Monday afternoon,
To show the boys about the mines
What old John L. was doin’.
We published a letter,
And told the story right,
How Lewis wrote to Louis
He was weary of the fight
How Lewis wrote to Louis
Giving him a tip
To take his bag and baggage
And leave the battered ship.
When Louey saw our extra,
He got in an awful heat;
He swore some awful cuss words,
As he tore up Union Street.
“I’ll get this Jim McLachlan,
I’ll wreck his bloody plant.”
But Louey sort of weakened
When he noticed Leighton Grant.

Chorus
Then he walked right in, turned around,
And he walked right out some more,
Leighton Grant was close behind
When Louey cleared the door.
Just one look at Mr. Grant,
And Louey filt a pain:
So he walked right in, turned around,
And he walked right out again.

Grant was folding papers,
As peaceful as could be
When Louey rushes wildly in,
And Louey says, says he:
“Where’s this man, McLachlan,
And what right has he
To publish that letter
My master sent to me;
Where did he get that letter?”
Poor Louey tore his hair,
“oh,, damn you, Jim McLachlan,
There’s dirty work somewhere.
That letter there was only meant
For just John L. and me,
It’s in the Labor Herald now
Where everyone can see:
I’ll fix you, Jim McLachlan,
You’ll never have a chance-”
Poor Louey never finished-
Someone grabbed him by the pants!

MLH 27 September 1924, p.

By Albert Lionais

Albert Lionais – acoustic guitar and vocals, Colin Grant- fiddle

About Albert Lionais

Albert Lionais spends much of his days drinking tea and listening to old LPs. He grew up in a musical family in Little Bras d’Or on Cape Breton Island and spent much of his childhood making music with his family, playing in marching bands and the school orchestra. Over the past few years Albert has taken to writing folk songs and telling stories of what could very well be real life situations. He currently resides in Sydney, Cape Breton and wishes to one day live as a recluse down north with his record player, a dog, a guitar and a pretty lady.

The Ballad of Slim McInnis // The Ballad of Slim McInnis - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  1. The Ballad of Slim McInnis // The Ballad of Slim McInnis - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  2. Doscomocracy // Doscomocracy - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  3. Trampin’ Down the Highway // Trampin’ Down the Highway - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  4. Quaint Harbour // Quaint Harbour - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  5. Blackheart’s of the Company // Blackheart’s of the Company - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  6. Stand the Gaff // Stand the Gaff - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  7. Michael’s Tune // Michael’s Tune - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  8. Arise Ye Nova Scotia Slaves // Arise Ye Nova Scotia Slaves - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  9. Whatever It Takes // Whatever It Takes - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  10. The Wearing of the Red // The Wearing of the Red - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  11. Down at Sydney Steel // Sydney Steel - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  12. Stronger then Steel // Stronger then Steel - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  13. Steel Winds // Steel Winds - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  14. A Cape Breton Lament // A Cape Breton Lament - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  15. An Seann Tigh Sgoil // An Seann Tigh Sgoil - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  16. Friday Evening // Ian MacDougall - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  17. The Voice of the Worker // The Voice of the Worker - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  18. Daughters Awake // Daughters Awake - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  19. Cape Breton Miner and Besco // Cape Breton Miner and Besco - Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  20. Miner’s Wife // Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest
  21. Steel Workers Lament // Songs of Steel, Coal and Protest